Messianic moshav hosts holiday market for Shavuot

Shavuot Fair at Yad Hashmona, June 2, 2017 (Photo: Nicole Smadja)

Yad Hashmona, the only Israeli messianic community of its kind in Israel, has expanded as many new families have recently moved into the moshav (communal village), blessing this special place with children, youth and young couples, not to mention quite a few talented people with new and refreshing ideas.

On June 2, residents hosted the “Shavuot Fair” in the main square of the moshav. Residents, guests from the guesthouse at Yad Hashmona and people from neighboring towns enjoyed a market full of home delicacies, decorative objects, designed greeting cards, natural products and more.

Children and youth, men and women, anyone who had something to prepare, display and sell was able to open a table and do so. Little children set up lemonade and orange juice stands along with popcorn bags and chocolate chip cookies they had prepared. A group of girls played string instruments. Adults sold homemade cakes and traditional dishes such as Persian food plus art work, handicrafts and handmade sewing to name a few items.

Valerie Yanai, a resident of the village who had the idea of doing the fair, told KNI that the idea came from her upbringing in Europe where popular Christmas markets have become a place for artisans to sell hand-crafted goods in a festive atmosphere.

“It all began last Hanukkah when I noticed that I know a good number of mothers who create handmade items,” Yanai said. “I thought it would be great to make a small home sale. My family and I lived for many years in Neve Ilan and saw this as a good opportunity to host a small fair and invited our neighbors that we are in good contact with from Neve Ilan to our new home in Yad Hashmona.”

The Hanukkah market was a modest but special event. Yanai said people enjoyed drinking the hot cider and seeing new art and styles. Due to the success and warm reception at that first fair, Yanai “thought it was a good idea and that something had to be done — perhaps a little bigger — that would give a stage to more talented artists.

“And so the ‘Yad Hashmona Fair’ was created,” Yanai said. “People came to sell and to present the special things they do. It was very nice to see what everyone knows and can do.”

Vendors from around the country were invited.

“Many non-believers came to this fair and I hope that in the future, more will continue to come,” Yanai said. “I hope that we will be able to host this fair twice a year and that people from all over the country and the villages that surround Yad Hashmona will be able to come and be blessed and that we will be able to be a witness and light to them through this.”

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photo by Nicole Smadja
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photo by Nicole Smadja
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photo by Nicole Smadja
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photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja
photo by Nicole Smadja